Old England: A Pictorial Museum (page 37/50)

[picture: 1060.---Cathedral of Kildare.]

1060.—Cathedral of Kildare.

“At Kildare, in ireland, still remain the relics of a small building in which, previous to the thirteenth century, the holy fire of St. Brigid used to be kept burning. It was suppressed at that period, by Henry de Loundres, Archbishop of Dublin, a man who seemed to rise above many of the superstitions of his age. After his death it was revived, and [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 1140.---Library Chair, Reading Table, and Reading Desk (Royal MS. 15D iii.)]

1140.—Library Chair, Reading Table, and Reading Desk (Royal MS. 15D iii.)

“The square-backed chair (Fig. 1146) was frequent in the mansions of the thirteenth century. In the fourteenth, they, and other articles combining household utility and elegance, were modified by the pointed architecture, and partook of the beautiful variety of its forms: this, in the engraving of Library furniture (Fig. 1140) we see in the reading-table [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: Book stand (Detail from Fig. 1140)]

Book stand (Detail from Fig. 1140)

The book stand taken from Fig. 1140. Mediæval clip art. Or, for Americans, medieval clip art. [$]

[picture: 1141.---Bed.]

1141.—Bed.

“Of the domestic furniture of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries the beds of the nobility (Figs. 1141, 1142) were most lavishly adorned. The simple form was that of a railed box, or crib; the “brases,” or rails, of costly material: the draperies at the head magnificent in substance and in armorial blazonry. In the wills of our old nobility, one bed is mentioned “powdered with blue eagles,” one of red velvet, with ostrich feathers of silver, and heads of leopards of gold; ohers of black velvet, black satin, blue, red, and white [...]fur of ermines, are also specified; and sheets of fair white silk, and pillows from the East.” (p. 329) [more...] [$]

[picture: 1142.---Bed.]

1142.—Bed.

“Of the domestic furniture of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries the beds of the nobility (Figs. 1141, 1142) were most lavishly adorned. The simple form was that of a railed box, or crib; the “brases,” or rails, of costly material: the draperies at the head magnificent in substance and in armorial blazonry. In the wills of our old nobility, one bed is mentioned “powdered with blue eagles,” one of red velvet, with ostrich feathers of silver, and heads of leopards of gold; ohers of black velvet, black satin, blue, red, and white [...]fur of ermines, are also specified; and sheets of fair white silk, and pillows from the East.” (p. 329) [more...] [$]

[picture: 1143.---Mummers (Bodleian MS.)]

1143.—Mummers (Bodleian MS.)

On the far left a young mang with curly hair wears a plain robe or long tunic; he plays a lute or other stringed instrment. There are then, from left to right, a person wearing the head of a deer, a person dressed in plain mediƦval (or “medieval”) clothes, a person dressed as a rabbit, and another perhaps as a bull, and on the right a woman. The [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 1144.---Quarter-staff (From the Old Ballad of Robin Hood and the Tanner.)]

1144.—Quarter-staff (From the Old Ballad of Robin Hood and the Tanner.)

“Quarter-staff (Fig. 1144) was the glory of the stout old English peasant or yeoman, in which, as far as we can learn, he was without a competitor in any foreign nation.” (p. 334) [more...] [$]

[picture: 1145.---Playing at Draughts (Harleian MS. 4431)]

1145.—Playing at Draughts (Harleian MS. 4431)

Two men in mediƦval clothing [US: medieval] sit with a draughts [US: drafts or checkers] board balance between their knees. Two other men, one a knight [...] [more...] [$]


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