Old England: A Pictorial Museum (page 11/50)

[picture: 67.---Circular British Shield.]

67.—Circular British Shield.

“It is equally difficult to determine the date of those valuable relics which have been found in various places, exhibiting a taste for symmetry and nice workmanship in the fabrication of their weapons, offensive and defensive, and the ruder decorations of their persons. Such are the [...]Flintshire, now in the British Museum (Fig. 64). Such are the shields (Figs. 65, 66, 67), of one of which (Fig. 67) Sir Samuel Meyrick, its possessor, says, “It is impossible to contemplate the artistic portions without feeling convinced that there is a mixture of British ornaments with such resemblances to the elegant designs on Roman works as would be produced by a people in a state of less civilization.” (p. 22) [more...] [$]

[picture: 68.---Ancient British Coins.]

68.—Ancient British Coins.

“the great variety of British coins, of which we here present a group (Fig. 68).” (p. 22) [more...] [$]

[picture: 69.---Group of Ring Coins.]

69.—Group of Ring Coins.

“Ring-money, peculiar to the Celtic nations, undoubtedly existed in Ireland previous to the domination of the Romans in Britain. Although Cæsar says that the ancient Britons had no coined money, there is sufficient probability that they had their metal plates for purposes of [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 70.---Celt.]

70.—Celt.

“The weapons of the ancient Britons show their acquaintance with the casting of metals. Their axe-heads, called Celts, are composed of ten parts of copper and one of tin (Figs. 70 and 71); their spear-heads, of six parts of copper and one of tin. Moulds for spear-heads have been frequently found [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 71.---Celt.]

71.—Celt.

“The weapons of the ancient Britons show their acquaintance with the casting of metals. Their axe-heads, called Celts, are composed of ten parts of copper and one of tin (Figs. 70 and 71); their spear-heads, of six parts of copper and one of tin. Moulds for spear-heads have been frequently found [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 72.---Spear Mould.]

72.—Spear Mould.

“The weapons of the ancient Britons show their acquaintance with the casting of metals. Their axe-heads, called Celts, are composed of ten parts of copper and one of tin (Figs. 70 and 71); their spear-heads, of six parts of copper and one of tin. Moulds for spear-heads have been frequently found [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 73.---Spear as it would have come from the Mould.]

73.—Spear as it would have come from the Mould.

“The weapons of the ancient Britons show their acquaintance with the casting of metals. Their axe-heads, called Celts, are composed of ten parts of copper and one of tin (Figs. 70 and 71); their spear-heads, of six parts of copper and one of tin. Moulds for spear-heads have been frequently found [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 74.---Welsh Agricultural Cart]

74.—Welsh Agricultural Cart

“There are no remains of those terrible war-chariots of the Britons which Cæsar describes as striking terror into his legions. King, who labours very hard to prove that the people who stood up not only with undaunted courage, but military skill, against the conquerors of the world, were but painted savages, considers that the British war-chariot was [...] [more...] [$]


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