Old England: A Pictorial Museum (page 12/51)

[picture: 74.---Welsh Agricultural Cart]

74.—Welsh Agricultural Cart

“There are no remains of those terrible war-chariots of the Britons which C├Žsar describes as striking terror into his legions. King, who labours very hard to prove that the people who stood up not only with undaunted courage, but military skill, against the conquerors of the world, were but painted savages, considers that the British war-chariot was [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 75.---British War Chariot, Shield and Spears.]

75.—British War Chariot, Shield and Spears.

A war chariot, with scythed blades coming out from the wheels, lies with an axe (US: ax, battle-axe, battle-ax) underneath it, and with two spears and a shield resting on it. [more...] [$]

[picture: Floriated initial letter ``T'']

Floriated initial letter “T”

An early Victorian capital letter T used as a 14-line drop cap. There is shading used to create a three-dimensional effect, enhanced by foliage going both [...]coloured version which is more dramatic (and easy to re-colour using colour replacement). [more...] [$]

[picture: Floriated initial letter T, coloured version]
[picture: 76.---The Herefordshire Beacon.]

76.—The Herefordshire Beacon.

There are disagreements about whether the Herefordshire Beacon is the remains of an iron-age hill fort or perhaps is an unfinished Norman motte-and-bailey castle of the 11th century; an excavation in the 19th century did a lot of damage. Modern consensus appears to be that it dates from the 3rd century BC. At any rate this is a fine engraving, using [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 77.---British Camp at caer Caradoc.---From Roy's Military Antiquities.]

77.—British Camp at caer Caradoc.—From Roy’s Military Antiquities.

Major-General William Roy produced The Military Antiquities of the Romans in Britain in 1793. [more...] [$]

[picture: 79.---Symbols of Rome.]

79.—Symbols of Rome.

“In the latter part of the summer of the year 55 B. C. (Halley, the astronomer, has gone far to prove that the exact day was the 26th of August), a Roman fleet crossed the Channel, bearing [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 80.---British and Roman Weapons.]

80.—British and Roman Weapons.

In the latter part of the summer of the year 55 B. C. (Halley, the astronomer, has gone far to prove that the exact day was the 26th of August), a Roman fleet crossed the Channel, bearing the infantry of two legions, about ten thousand men. This army was collected at the Portus Itius (Witsand), between Calais and Boulogne. Eighty galleys (Fig. 86) bore [...] [more...] [$]


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