Old England: A Pictorial Museum (page 42/50)

[picture: 1381.---Trap-Ball.]


This game may be similar to Ball-and-Trap or Knurr and Spell, two traditional English ball-games that are still played. If so, the ball is on a see-saw an the play will hit the other end of it to make the ball fly into the air; when the ball ascends the player will strike the ball with the bat, trying to hit a particular target or to get the ball to [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 1384.---Golf, or Bandy-ball.]

1384.—Golf, or Bandy-ball.

(From a M.S. in the Douce Collection.) [more...] [$]

[picture: 1385.---The Dance in the `Garden of Pleasure:' from the `Roman de la Rose.'---(Harl. MS. 4425.)]

1385.—The Dance in the ‘Garden of Pleasure:’ from the ‘Roman de la Rose.’—(Harl. MS. 4425.)

The Story of the Rose was a very popular mediæval French story about chivalry and knightly love. Here we have an engraving based on a painting in one particular manuscript copy made in about A.D. 1500. There’s some word-play going on: the walled garden is owned by one M. Déduit; the man’s name istself means “pleasure.” We see the wingéd God of Love in the background. [more...] [$]

[picture: 1387.---Leaping through a Hoop. (ANcient MS. engraved in Strutt's Sports)]

1387.—Leaping through a Hoop. (ANcient MS. engraved in Strutt’s Sports)

A boy, barefoot, stands with arms outstretched; perhaps he has been running. He is about to jump or leap through a ring or hoop held by his two smiling play-mates. [more...] [$]

[picture: 1389.---Ancient Dice Box.]

1389.—Ancient Dice Box.

The government of Edward IV.—a thing of force—grows alarmed at the idea of any decrease of the materials of force, and so the popular sports are condemned, and the instruments used in them are to be destroyed;—dice (Fig. 1389) among the rest; and shooting-butts (Fig. 1375) are to be erected in every township. But he edict fails; the use of the [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 1390.---Shuttle-Cock (From a MS. in the Douce Collection.)]

1390.—Shuttle-Cock (From a MS. in the Douce Collection.)

Two boys or men are seen playing shuttlecock with wide bats. Is this an early form of badminton? [$]

[picture: Methley Hall]

Methley Hall

“Methley Hall, or Methley Park, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, seven miles south-east from Leeds, is the seat of the Saviles, Earls Mexborough, which family have held the manor for several centuries. The original manor-house was built by Sir Robert Waterton, in the reign of Henry IV.; but after the manor became the property of the Saviles, the old [...]i.e. outside], but contains some very fine apartments, one of which, with its beautiful painted ceiling and pendent ornaments, its antique [as of 1845] furniture, rich carving, and lofty mullioned windows, is exhibited in out coloured engraving.” (p. v) [more...] [$]

[picture: Methley Hall, Wallpaper Version]

Methley Hall, Wallpaper Version

A version of the Methley Hall coloured engraving; this version has been cropped slightly so that it’s the right size for a computer desktop background, or wallpaper. [more...] [$]

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