The Antiquities of England and Wales Vol III (page 1/2)

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Pictures, Maps and Text from Volume III of The Antiquities of England and Wales by Captain Francis Grose. I also have Volume I. I bought Volume 3 from a rather unscrupulous (it seems) book dealer in Cornwall, who neglected to mention the missing maps.

There is a short biography of Francis Grose from 1814.

The maps in this series of books were originally engraved in about 1694 for John Seller’s Anglia Contracta. John Seller was a noted map maker and publisher of the second half of the 17th century, known especially for his sea charts. Years later Francis Grose got hold of the engraved plates for the maps and used them in this popular series of Antiquities, removing the John Seller cartouche. The colour in the maps would have been added by hand after printing.

Captain Francis Grose is also known for compiling dictionaries. I have a copy of his Provincial Glossary. He also wrote a dictionary of slang; Project Gutenberg has made a text version of an 1811 version of this (I have a fac simile edition) and I have used this as a starting point, corrected many errors, and put it online as the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

There is also an entry in the Nuttall Encyclopædia for Captain Francis Grose.

Title: The Antiquities of England and Wales Vol III

Author: Grose, Francis

Published by: C. Clarke, for S. Hooper

City: London

Date: 1783

Total items: 7

Out of copyright (called public domain in the USA), hence royalty-free for all purposes usage credit requested, or as marked.

Some sample images

[picture: The White Tower, or Tower of London]

The White Tower, or Tower of London

This tower was erected anno 1079, by William the Conqueror, as a keep to a fortress begun by him in the year 1067, to awe the citizens of london; the architect was Gundulph, bishop of Rochester. Fitz Stephens has falsely [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: Antique map of Kent]

Antique map of Kent

This map of Kent was published in 1783; it shows, in the Lathe of Sutton, Woolwich, Greenwich, Eltham, Lewisham, Brownley, Dartford, S. Mary Cray, Dunton, Farmingham, Sevenoke [Sevenoak], Westerham. Sutton, Edenbridg [Edenbridge]; in the Lathe of Aylesford, Allhollowes, Cliff, Gravesend, Cowley, Halstow, Osterland Chatham, Meopham, Haling, Wortham, [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: The Chapel of St. Pancras in St. Augustine's Monastery, Canterbury]

The Chapel of St. Pancras in St. Augustine’s Monastery, Canterbury

The ruins of this little oratory stand near the south-easternmost part of the Abbey-close. It is commonly supposed to be of great antiquity, but this opinion is controverted by [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: Leibourn Castle, Kent, Plate 1]

Leibourn Castle, Kent, Plate 1

Pub 10th Sept. 1784. by S. Hooper. R Godfrey Sc. [more...] [$]

[picture: Bookplate (ex libris) from Volume III, colour version]

Bookplate (ex libris) from Volume III, colour version

This is a lower-resolution scan of the bookplage. [$]


Tags in this source:

bookplates castles chapels colour greyscale heraldry maps people ruins towers trees

Places shown:

Canterbury ·Hythe ·Kent ·Leybourne ·London ·Westenhanger ·none

Pictures, Maps and Text from Volume III of The Antiquities of England and Wales by Captain Francis Grose. I also have Volume I. I bought Volume 3 from a rather unscrupulous (it seems) book dealer in Cornwall, who neglected to mention the missing maps.

There is a short biography of Francis Grose from 1814.

The maps in this series of books were originally engraved in about 1694 for John Seller’s Anglia Contracta. John Seller was a noted map maker and publisher of the second half of the 17th century, known especially for his sea charts. Years later Francis Grose got hold of the engraved plates for the maps and used them in this popular series of Antiquities, removing the John Seller cartouche. The colour in the maps would have been added by hand after printing.

Captain Francis Grose is also known for compiling dictionaries. I have a copy of his Provincial Glossary. He also wrote a dictionary of slang; Project Gutenberg has made a text version of an 1811 version of this (I have a fac simile edition) and I have used this as a starting point, corrected many errors, and put it online as the 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

There is also an entry in the Nuttall Encyclopædia for Captain Francis Grose.


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