Record of Fifty Years’ Work, A (page 1/3)

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[picture: Front Cover, The Brothers Dalziel]

Pictures from A Record Of Work – 1840 – 1890 by The Brothers Dalziel (London, 1901).

There were eight Dalziel brothers: William Dalziel (the eldest) whose art work was chiefly devoted to heraldic and occasional ornamental decoration for manuscript work, and was also a still-life painter; Robert Dalziel, a portrait painter; Alexander Dalziel a draughtsman, who died of consumption at the age of 23; George Dalziel, a pupil of Charles Gray (an engraver on wood); Edward Dalziel (1817 – 1905), who joined his younger brother George; John Dalziel, who was also an egraver, but who also died young; Thomas Dalziel (1823-1906), who was trained in copperplate engraving, but who later joined George and Edward in engraving on wood; The youngest, Davison Dalziel, “applied himself very successfully to commerce.”

The book is primarily by George and Edward Dalziel.

This book is online on archive.org although, as usual, the images there are of poor quality.

Title: Record of Fifty Years’ Work, A

Author: Dalziel, the Brothers

Published by: Methuen and Co.

City: London

Date: 1901

Total items: 19

Out of copyright (called public domain in the USA), hence royalty-free for all purposes usage credit requested, or as marked.

Some sample images

[picture: Front Cover, The Brothers Dalziel]

Front Cover, The Brothers Dalziel

Handsome dark blue book with gold lettering. [$]

[picture: The Adoration of the Maji.  By F. R. Pickersgill, R.A.]

The Adoration of the Maji. By F. R. Pickersgill, R.A.

The Adoration of the Magi, or Maji, or Wise Men, or th eThree Kings (the Gospels do not say that they were kings, nor that there were three of them) is a popular subject; here two of them are prostrate on the ground, barefoot, while a third waits. Mary might havea Jewish [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: The Old year and the New: the jester crowns the new year as a young woman, and ushers out the old year, an old woman.]

The Old year and the New

A jester crowns the new year as a young woman, and ushers out the old year, an old woman. This picture was obviously made for the end of 1866 and the start of 1867; it is dated 1867 in the text. It was commissioned from the artist Paul Gray by the Dalziel [...]FUN. [more...] [$]

[picture: Their beds are made in swelling turf]

Their beds are made in swelling turf

A child, a girl in a long billowy dress perhaps, kneels in a graveyard in the winter snow, perhaps in moonlight. She holds a shovel, covering a grave perhaps. She is grieving. [more...] [$]

[picture: Moses Views the Promised Land]

Moses Views the Promised Land

“By Lord Leighton, P.R.A., from “Dalziel’s Bible Gallery.” [more...] [$]


Tags in this source:

angels animals bare feet beaches beards biblical scenes book covers borders christmas colour comics dance death dogs drawings faces floriated borders fool fruit grapes gravestones graveyards greyscale grief horses jesters keyboards king lear knights leaves mountains mourning music musical instruments new year night scenes nudity page images people person poetry punishments religion rocks scholars shakespear slavery slaves snow spinets spirit spooky sports title pages tombs twigs vines walking weather wings winter women

Places shown:

Abarim ·Baden-Württemberg ·Moab ·Scotland ·Windeck ·none

Pictures from A Record Of Work – 1840 – 1890 by The Brothers Dalziel (London, 1901).

There were eight Dalziel brothers: William Dalziel (the eldest) whose art work was chiefly devoted to heraldic and occasional ornamental decoration for manuscript work, and was also a still-life painter; Robert Dalziel, a portrait painter; Alexander Dalziel a draughtsman, who died of consumption at the age of 23; George Dalziel, a pupil of Charles Gray (an engraver on wood); Edward Dalziel (1817 – 1905), who joined his younger brother George; John Dalziel, who was also an egraver, but who also died young; Thomas Dalziel (1823-1906), who was trained in copperplate engraving, but who later joined George and Edward in engraving on wood; The youngest, Davison Dalziel, “applied himself very successfully to commerce.”

The book is primarily by George and Edward Dalziel.

This book is online on archive.org although, as usual, the images there are of poor quality.


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