Works of Jane Austen

Pictures from The Works of Jane Austen published by Fank S. Holby in 1906; the illustrations are signed C. E. Brock, 1898.

These images were scanned by “The Sanity Inspector” of Atlanta, USA, for his blog, All Edges Gilt, and appear here with his kind permission.

I think that this is The Novels and Letters [Works] of Jane Austen Edited by R. Brimley Johnson; with an Introduction by Prof. William Lyon Phelps, in 12 volumes, and limited to 1250 copies. It was published in New York in 1906, and hence is out of copyright. The artist, Charles Edmund Brock, was English, and died in 1938, so his work in any case fell out of copyright at the end of 2008.

[picture: To take three thousand pounds from the fortune of their dear little boy would be impoverishing him.]

To take three thousand pounds from the fortune of their dear little boy would be impoverishing him.

Mrs. John Dashwood did not at all approve of what her husband intended to do for his sisters. To take three thousand pounds from the fortune of their dear little boy would be impoverishing him to the most dreadful degree. She begged him to think again on the subject. How could he answer it to himself to rob his child, and his only child too, of so large [...]Sense and Sensibility Chapter 2) [more...]

[picture: The gentleman offered his services, took her up in his arms, and carried her down the hill.]

The gentleman offered his services, took her up in his arms, and carried her down the hill.

A gentleman carrying a gun, with two pointers [dogs] playing round him, was passing up the hill and within a few yards of Marianne, when her accident happened. He put down his gun and ran to her assistance. She had raised herself from the ground, but her foot had been twisted in the fall, and she was scarcely able to stand. The gentleman offered [...]Sense and Sensibility Chapter 9) [more...]

[picture: He received the kindest welcome from her; and shyness, coldness, reserve, could not stand against such a reception]

He received the kindest welcome from her; and shyness, coldness, reserve, could not stand against such a reception

Mrs. Dashwood was surprised only for a moment at seeing him; for his coming to Barton was, in her opinion, of all things the most natural. Her joy and expression of regard long outlived her wonder. He received the kindest welcome from her; and shyness, coldness, reserve could not stand against such a reception. They had begun to fail him before he [...]Sense and Sensibility, Chapter 17) [more...]



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