A Textbook on Ornamental Design

Some diagrams and illustrations taken from A Textbook on Ornamental Design published by International Correspondence Schools, Scranton, PA., USA, 1901.

There are two volumes; there was originally also a portfolio of images, which is not present in my copies of the books.

[picture: Front Cover]

Front Cover

The front cover of “Ornamental Design” is not itself very ornamented.

[picture: Title Page]

Title Page

a textbook on
ORNAMENTAL DESIGN
International Correspondence Schools
scranton, PA.
[more...]

[picture: 11.---Drawing a circle with the compasses.]

11.—Drawing a circle with the compasses.

Showing how to draw a circle with a pair of compasses. [more...]

[picture: 12.---Dividers.]

12.—Dividers.

Dividers are like compasses but with two sharp points, and can be used for measuring distances.

[picture: 13.---Bow Pencil and Bow Pen]

13.—Bow Pencil and Bow Pen

For drawing circles with.

[picture: 14.---How to sharpen a pencil]

14.—How to sharpen a pencil

With a point.

[picture: 15.---Holding a Ruling Pen.]

15.—Holding a Ruling Pen.

“13. Inking.—For drawing ink lines other than arcs of circles, the ruling pen (or right-line pen, as it is sometimes called) is used. Its should be held as nearly perpendicular to the board as possible, with the hand in the position shown in Figs. 15 and 16, bearing lightly against the T square or triangle, along the edge of which the line is drawn. After a little more practice, this position will become more natural, and no difficulty will be experienced.” (pp. 11 – 12) [more...]

[picture: 16.---Holding a Ruling Pen]

16.—Holding a Ruling Pen

“13. Inking.—For drawing ink lines other than arcs of circles, the ruling pen (or right-line pen, as it is sometimes called) is used. Its should be held as nearly perpendicular to the board as possible, with the hand in the position shown in Figs. 15 and 16, bearing lightly against the T square or triangle, along the edge of which the line is drawn. After a little more practice, this position will become more natural, and no difficulty will be experienced.” (pp. 11 – 12) [more...]

[picture: Figure 3.54.---Ionic Frieze]

Figure 3.54.—Ionic Frieze

88. Ionic Order.—In Fig. 54 is shown a frieze from the principal Ionic temple in Athens, the Erechtheum, the style of which is typical of this class of relief ornament throughout Greek design. it is plainly a development, in relief, of the brush forms shown in Fig. 47; and the addition of scrolls at the bottom, and leaves, from which the forms appear to spring, [...] [more...]

[picture: Figure 3.55.---Corinthian Ornament.]

Figure 3.55.—Corinthian Ornament.

89. Corinthian Order.—In Fig. 55, however, is shown a section of ornament from the choragic monument of Lysicrates at Athens. This is the principal structure of Greek origin designed in the Corinthian order. fig. 55 is an ornament from the top of the above monument, and shows not only the elaboration of ornament characteristic of this order, but [...] utmost importance in its relation to the lack of invention of new forms and the restraining influences of certain art periods. [more...]

[picture: Figure 3.56.---Acanthus Leaf.]

Figure 3.56.—Acanthus Leaf.

In Fig. 56 is shwon a form of the acanthus leaf taken from the Tower of the Winds at Athens. it is purely conventional in form, possessing a broad, bold treatment, necessary or its execution in stone, and following closely the principles of the growing plant, as [...] [more...]



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