Old England: A Pictorial Museum (page 16/50)

[picture: 106.---Plan of Pevensey Castle.]

106.—Plan of Pevensey Castle.

On the north side was a few years since a fragment of a supposed Saxon keep, held to be an addition to the original Roman Castrum (Fig. 109). But the most important and interesting adaptation to another period of the Roman Pevensey is the Norman keep, the form of which is indicated on the Plan 106, at the south-east, and which was evidently fitted upon [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 107.---Walls and Gate, Pevensey.]

107.—Walls and Gate, Pevensey.

Here, as at Richborough, have the Roman galleys anchored; sheltered by the bold promontory of Beachy Head from the south-west gales, and secured from the attacks of pirates by the garrison who guarded those walls. We ascend the cliff from the village, and enter the area within the walls at the opening on the east (Plan 106). The external appearance [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 108.---Walls, Pevensey.]

108.—Walls, Pevensey.

The walls at Pevensey Castle show some Roman features as well as later additions. [more...] [$]

[picture: 109.---Supposed Saxon Keep, Pevensey.]

109.—Supposed Saxon Keep, Pevensey.

Sheep graze in the foreground; in the background a stone archway frames a tunnel through heavy masonry, a ruined tower. [more...] [$]

[picture: 110.---Sally Port, Pevensey.]

110.—Sally Port, Pevensey.

The ponderous walls of the Roman dominion are almost merged in the greater interest of the moated keep of the Norman conquest. It will be sufficient for us here to present engravings of the Norman works (Figs. 110, 111, 112), reserving their description for another Book. The area within the Roman walls of Pevensey is seven acres. The irregular form [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 111.---Norman Keep, Pevensey.]

111.—Norman Keep, Pevensey.

A ruined castle with broken towers overgrown with ivy looms in the background on a hill or mound; in the foreground people admire the view; to emphasise the pastoral nature [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 112.---Interior of Norman Tower, Pevensey.]

112.—Interior of Norman Tower, Pevensey.

But the most important and interesting adaptation to another period of the Roman Pevensey is the Norman keep, the form of which is indicated on the Plan 106, at the south-east, and which was evidently fitted upon the original Roman wall so as to form the coast defence on that side. We purposely reserve any minute description of this very remarkable [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 113.---The Thames at Coway Stakes.]

113.—The Thames at Coway Stakes.

Tall trees sway either side of a dirt road down which a cart is pulled way from us by a pair of heavy horses; two women and a dog approach us on the same road. In the background a barge is pulled along a wide, winding river by a team of maybe five horses walking along the riverbank. All [...] [more...] [$]


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