Old England: A Pictorial Museum (page 14/52)

[picture: 56.---The Druid Grove.]

56.—The Druid Grove.

A bearded and robed man sits in the shade of a giant tree, probably an oak tree; in the background a group of three robed figures surrounds a smaller tree. [more...] [$]

[picture: The Coronation Chair]

The Coronation Chair

The celebrated stone which now forms the seat of the coronation chair of the sovereigns of England is a flat stone, nearly square. It formerly stood in Argyleshire, according to Buchanan; who also says that King Kenneth, in the ninth century, transferred it to Scone, and enclosed it in a wooden chair. The monkish tradition was, that it was the identical [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 59.---British Pearl Shells.  Natural Size.]

59.—British Pearl Shells. Natural Size.

a. Duck fresh-water Pearl Mussel (Anodon Anatinus). b. Swan ditto (Anodon Cygneus). [more...] [$]

[picture: 60.---Woad  (Isatis Tinctoria)]

60.—Woad (Isatis Tinctoria)

“The dresses of the inhabitants of Britain before the Roman invasion are not, like those of the people of ancient Egypt, and other countries advanced in the practice of the imitative arts, to be traced in painting or sculpture. In Roman statues we have the figures of ancient Gauls, which give us the characteristic dress of the Celtic nations: the braccæ, [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 61.---Gaulish Costume.]

61.—Gaulish Costume.

“The dresses of the inhabitants of Britain before the Roman invasion are not, like those of the people of ancient Egypt, and other countries advanced in the practice of the imitative arts, to be traced in painting or sculpture. In Roman statues we have the figures of ancient Gauls, which give us the characteristic dress of the Celtic nations: the braccæ, [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 62.---Gaulish Costume.]

62.—Gaulish Costume.

“The dresses of the inhabitants of Britain before the Roman invasion are not, like those of the people of ancient Egypt, and other countries advanced in the practice of the imitative arts, to be traced in painting or sculpture. In Roman statues we have the figures of ancient Gauls, which give us the characteristic dress of the Celtic nations: the braccæ, [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 63.---Gaulish Costume.]

63.—Gaulish Costume.

“The dresses of the inhabitants of Britain before the Roman invasion are not, like those of the people of ancient Egypt, and other countries advanced in the practice of the imitative arts, to be traced in painting or sculpture. In Roman statues we have the figures of ancient Gauls, which give us the characteristic dress of the Celtic nations: the braccæ, [...] [more...] [$]

[picture: 64.---Breast Plate]

64.—Breast Plate

“It is difficult to assign an exact period to their use of cloth in preference to skins. It is equally difficult to determine the date of those valuable relics which have been found in various places, exhibiting a taste for symmetry and nice workmanship in the fabrication of their weapons, offensive and defensive, and the ruder decorations of their [...]Flintshire, now in the British Museum (Fig. 64).” (p. 22) [more...] [$]


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