Wynkyn de Worde

was the first afsistant, and successor of Caxton. He was born in the duke­dom of Lorraine, and became a denizen of England in 1496. Throughout the whole range of our ancient typographers, there is scarcely one whose memory beams with greater effulgence than that of Wynkyn de Worde: he gained this high distinction not only from the number of his publications, but also from the typographical excellence which they ex­hibit. On the death of Caxton, he successfully practised the art of printing on his own account in his master’s house. In this office he appears to have continued until the year 1499, when he removed to the “sign of the Golden Sun, in the parish of St. Bride, in the Fletestrete, London,” He does not appear to have left this neighbourhood, as in his will he directs his body to be buried in the parochial church of St. Bride, Fleet Street, before the high altar of St. Katharine. He died in 1534.

Taken from Gesta Typographica by Chas. Jacobi, 1897, page 33.

Vignette

*

Classical Names of Towns and Cities

Foolscap

Joha Baptist Bodoni

The Mazarine Bible.

John Bagford

Printing was introduced into Scotland

William Caxton

The First Edition of the New Testament in Greek

Aldus Manutius

Italic Type

Vignette

Wynkyn de Worde

Classical Names of Towns and Cities

The first almanack