Get your own copy of this book on Amazon

To Bite (Grose 1811 Dictionary)

To Bite

To over-reach, or impose; also to steal.—Cant. —Biting was once esteemed a kind of wit, similar to the humbug. An instance of it is given in the Spectator: A man under sentence of death having sold his body to a surgeon rather below the market price, on receiving the money, cried, A bite! I am to be hanged in chains.—To bite the roger; to steal a portmanteau. To bite the wiper, to steal a handkerchief. To bite on the bridle; to be pinched or reduced to difficulties. Hark ye, friend, whether do they bite in the collar or the cod-piece? Water wit to anglers.

Definition taken from The 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, originally by Francis Grose.

Bite * Biter

Nearby

Nathan Bailey's 1736 Dictionary of canting and thieving slang

John S. Farmer's collection of canting songs and slang rhymes

Birds of a Feather
Birth-day Suit
Bishop
Bishoped
To Bishop the Balls
Bit
Bitch
To Bitch
Bitch Booby
Bite
To Bite
Biter
Blab
Black and white
Black Art
Black A-se
Black Book
Black Box
Black Eye
Black Fly
Black Guard