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Lord (Grose 1811 Dictionary)

Lord

A crooked or hump-backed man. These unhappy people afford great scope for vulgar raillery; such as, ‘Did you come straight from home? if so, you have got confoundedly bent by the way.’ ‘Don’t abuse the gemman,’ adds a by-stander, ‘he has been grossly insulted already; don’t you see his back’s up?’ Or someone asks him if the show is behind; ‘because I see,’ adds he, ‘you have the drum at your back.’ Another piece of vulgar wit is let loose on a deformed person: If met by a party of soldiers on their march, one of them observes that that gentleman is on his march too, for he has got his knapsack at his back. It is said in the British Apollo, that the title of lord was first given to deformed persons in the reign of Richard III. from several persons labouring under that misfortune being created peers by him; but it is more probably derived from the Greek word [GREEK: lordos], crooked.

Definition taken from The 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, originally by Francis Grose.

See also the definition in Nathan Bailey's 1736 dictionary of canting and thieving slang.

To Lope * Louse

Nearby

Nathan Bailey's 1736 Dictionary of canting and thieving slang

John S. Farmer's collection of canting songs and slang rhymes

Long-winded
Loo
Looby
Looking As If One Could Not Help It
Looking-glass
Loon
Loonslate
Loophole
Lop-sided
To Lope
Lord
Louse
Love Begotten Child
Lounge
Louse Bag
Louse House
Louse Ladder
Louse Land
Louse Trap
Lout
Lowing Rig