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Jack of Legs (Grose 1811 Dictionary)

Jack of Legs

A tall long-legged man; also a giant, said to be buried in Weston church, near Baldock, in Hertfordshire, where there are two stones fourteen feet distant, said to be the head and feet stones of his grave. This giant, says Salmon, as fame goes, lived in a wood here, and was a great robber, but a generous one; for he plundered the rich to feed the poor: he frequently took bread for this purpose from the Baldock bakers, who catching him at an advantage, put out his eyes, and afterwards hanged him upon a knoll in Baldock field. At his death he made one request, which was, that he might have his bow and arrow put into his hand, and on shooting it off, where the arrow fell, they would bury him; which being granted, the arrow fell in Weston churchyard. Above seventy years ago, a very large thigh bone was taken out of the church chest, where it had lain many years for a show, and was sold by the clerk to Sir John Tradescant, who, it is said, put it among the rarities of Oxford.

Definition taken from The 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, originally by Francis Grose.

Jack Nasty Face * Jack Pudding

Nearby

Nathan Bailey's 1736 Dictionary of canting and thieving slang

John S. Farmer's collection of canting songs and slang rhymes

Jabber
Jack
Jack Adams
Jack At a Pinch
Jack In a Box
Jack In An Office
Jack Ketch
Jack Nasty Face
Jack of Legs
Jack Pudding
Jack Robinson
Jack Sprat
Jack Tar
Jack Weight
Jack Whore
Jackanapes
Jacked
Jackmen
Jackey